26 April

Design Journal: Farming in Elyria

By Snipehunter

We’ve mentioned it before, but one of the challenges of trying to create a true Multiplayer Evolving Online World is guaranteeing a richness of experience for all players, whether they be classical combat-oriented players, crafting players, strategic & political players, explorers & trailblazers, or some combination of them all. It’s not enough to build a world that simply makes possible a breadth of experience; you must make that entire spectrum of experience deep enough to satisfy players, wherever they look, whatever their motivation.

When we spoke about Blacksmithing last year, we showed that one way we address this is by ensuring we offer something that is more than just “press a button and wait for the timer” for every aspect of the economic system of Chronicles of Elyria. We also explained our basic framework for production; the crafting paradigm of the game that uses raw ingredients to make components that are then assembled into final products. But, in that example we discussed how a simple ingredient, iron ore in our case, was turned into a sword. We didn’t describe a craft where the raw ingredient must be developed or cultivated.

Farming is a critical trade in a world like Elyria, where starvation is a part of the robust survival mechanics that affects players and influences trade. It’s also the perfect example of how a raw ingredient -- an apple seed -- is developed and nurtured to become the renewable source of that ingredient.

At the abstract, farming is simple: You take a seed, you put it in the dirt, you make sure it gets water and sun, and you wait. Eventually it grows into a crop of some sort and you harvest it to get your produce. And, indeed, there are some games out there that simulate the craft of farming with almost exactly that formula. However, it’s not a particularly accurate simulation of the experience on the one hand and it’s not a very robust participant of the world’s economic systems, on the other. For us, that means we must go deeper. Our first stop? Soil.

Elyria is a large world, with a rich collection of biomes, each offering their own advantages and challenges. This is true right down to the soil itself. In Chronicles of Elyria, we track the condition of the soil. Is it acidic? What sort of soil is it? How well does it hold water? The soil of every biome is tracked in this way, down to 16m2 plots of land. The seeds or plants you sow have their own thresholds that determine acceptable conditions for them to enter the growth phase of their life-cycle. If the levels in the soil aren’t within the acceptable bands for the seed you're planting, it won’t grow. But, if they are within that acceptable band, how close they are to the plant’s perfect values will determine how quickly, or productively, the plant grows.


One of the easiest ways to affect the soil you’re planting in is to plow or till. Doing so won’t change some things, the Ph level of the soil isn’t going to raise or lower in a meaningful way, but you will increase the aeration rate of the soil and change its density, among other things. It will make it much easier to plant in and is required to add some alchemic compounds to the soil, should you need them.

In Chronicles of Elyria, tilling can be done by hand: You can, with a trowel, shovel, or hoe equipped, approach a plot of land and use the tool on it to turn over some of the soil. But, if your farming goals are more ambitious than that, you’ll probably want to use a plough with a beast of burden to till the soil in even furrows, quickly.

If you suspect that the soil needs further work, you’ll have to mediate the soil in some way. Usually this means adding fertilizer or some other alchemic compound to adjust those Ph levels and provide vital nutrients, but it could mean that you need to adjust another, more esoteric, property of the soil. Also worth noting, I think, is the fact that the plants you grow have an impact on the soil itself, as well. What you raised last season leaves it mark, drawing nutrients from the soil and depositing different resources of their own. With clever planning, it's possible to mediate the soil through techniques like crop rotation. Learning what your plants do to the soil is as important as learning what the soil will do for your plants.

It’s easier to add things into the soil as you till it, so this is usually done at the same time. However, knowing what needs to be added can be tricky since the people of Elyria lack the technology we do. Discovering and measuring these properties may not be easy or even possible at first. This means in some cases that the only way to learn things about the soil is to observe how it impacts the growth of the plants you’ve already started.

Whether you’ve carefully troweled around the plants to loosen the soil around them, or you’ve just turned bare earth to plant anew, adding compounds to the soil is done in the world. As a player, you take one of these compounds in hand and use it with the tilled earth in the plot, spreading it out and mixing it into the soil. Behind the scenes, the compounds will adjust the soils levels and make it better suited for your crops, assuming you’ve added the right compounds.

As with most aspects of Chronicles of Elyria, the mechanics related to farming are also tied into the knowledge system. The region-specific soil conditions are knowledge that gets added to your knowledge base. This knowledge can be shared, or even gleaned from someone else, so that you can benefit from the knowledge base of your neighbors. Or you could, perhaps, find a secondary trade in teaching that knowledge to others. The conditions of an individual plot within a biome may vary, but regional knowledge is still useful in getting started.

Once the ground is tilled, and the soil prepared, there’s really nothing left to do but to place the seeds themselves into the loosened soil. Every plant has its own idea of what ideal conditions can be. Some plants want to grow their roots in between the root structures of other larger plants, while other plants like to have the soil to themselves, so they have room to spread their roots into large networks. While sowing seeds for harvest can be as simple as scattering them into the soil, throwing a handful at a time into the dirt, you’ll need to be more mindful of how far apart you plant your seeds for something like an apple tree.

As a farmer in the game, you plant seeds by taking a stack of seeds into one hand from your inventory and then interacting with the soil inside a farm plot using that hand wherever you want to place a seed in the soil. This manual level of planting is perfect for things that you want to spread far apart from each other, like our apple trees, but if you’re sowing a field of wheat or something similar, there are faster ways.


When it comes time to mass sow seeds, say if you were growing turf or the aforementioned wheat, you could also take an entire bag or pouch of seeds from your inventory into your hand. When you interact with the soil using that bag or pouch you scatter the seeds around you instead of placing a single seed in the ground. There are, likewise, devices you can purchase and use that make the process of spreading seeds a quick and easy one.

The spacing of your plants can also be impacted by the conditions of the biome, too. Dry farmers will learn, for example, that you need more space between your plants to ensure the soil can bank more of the scant moisture that collects in semi-arid and arid biomes. Likewise, under certain conditions, you may want to intermix plants of different types because of the way they can fix soils or moisture into the soil, creating a mutually beneficial relationship between your various crops, the soil, and each other. In some environments, or to grow certain plants, you may also need to employ entirely different techniques. You might need to build a paddy field so that semi-aquatic plants you plant have plenty of access to water and can be protected from certain pests and predators that would otherwise have easy access to them. The conditions of your biome and the types of plants you are growing will together dictate what methods and strategies are best for your endeavors. There's not a single "right way" to farm for any plant, but there are certainly optimal conditions and effective techniques depending on your goal and your available resources.

That said, it’s generally a safe rule of thumb to treat the size of the resulting plant as a guideline for how far apart crops should be planted. There are some exceptions; some plants like to be close together despite being relatively large but, if you consider the size of a mature plant and draw a circle around it and then just about double that, you’ll have a pretty good rule to follow for spacing. In fact, when a plant checks to see if it’s crowded, it does something similar. It checks first to see what is within a certain radius to determine if it’s too crowded before going into more complicated check into things like the root systems of nearby plants.

And, of course, not everything you’ll plant is a seed, but the process is generally the same even for tubers or sprouts; what changes is the action that occurs when one uses the sprout or tuber on the soil. And once that action is complete, your seeds are in the ground and ready to start growing.


However, there is no guarantee that your seeds will germinate and take root. In some ways, what happens next is outside of a farmer’s control. Every plant has a life-cycle and transitions through its phases starting as a seed in a dormant phase. From there a seed will, if conditions are acceptable, enter a germination phase where the seed transforms into a sprout. A sprout then, if conditions are right, transitions into growth moving towards full maturity. For some plants, simply reaching maturity is only the halfway point towards producing something a farmer can harvest. Some plants, many fruit trees, for example, must also be induced to bear fruit; but more on that in a moment.

Our apple seed must survive and thrive through the environmental conditions it finds itself in to get to that point. As farmers, our job is to make those conditions as hospitable as possible. Whether that means protecting our crops from infestations & blights, ensuring they are properly irrigated, or simply making sure they’re planted in a way to get them the sunlight they need, crops depend on farmers to see them through the unpredictable seasons on Elyria.

The most common way a farmer sees to their crops is by ensuring they are properly watered. Sure, you could literally take a can or a wine-skin or some other vessel and manually water each plant in your field, but anyone who wants to grow at scale will soon realize that watering in that way is just labor intensive. Instead, most people will build irrigation systems.

In Chronicles of Elyria, you can’t physically dig into the terrain – you can’t dig a channel for water to flow through – but this technological constraint doesn’t mean you’re unable to use these irrigation techniques. Instead, when you dig an irrigation channel, using mechanics like those used when you dig a road, you’ll be placing irrigation “objects” on the terrain that, as a connected system, “draw water” from your primary water source to your plants.


While there are a few notable exceptions in arid regions, almost every culture has their own methods of irrigation that play with this central premise, and in some cases, what you’re building isn’t so much an irrigation network as a shallowly flooded pool or pond. That said, everything works pretty much the same way; you can essentially automate the process of watering your crops if you have the know-how and the skill or know someone who can do the building for you. Provided, of course, that you have access to water.

While it is a critical concern, Water is only one concern for a farmer. Even in Elyria, different kinds of plants prefer different levels of light and darkness when they grow. How much sunlight a plant wants in a given day is compared to how much it receives each day and the result is used in the calculations that determine if the plant grows or withers. In some case, plants will want shade to live their lives beneath, others will demand the sunlight, drinking in as much light as they can every day.

There’s not much a farmer can do about how much sunlight is available each day, but you can employ other strategies; building shaded areas for the plants that need it, or perhaps clearing obstructions that block a plant’s access to the sky. Sometimes, dealing with the amount of light your plants need is as simple as knowing ahead of time what they might or might not want and planting them in the right place. Then again, sometimes it’s just a bad year and thanks to nasty weather there just isn’t enough light to go around. Some plants even demand total darkness, such as the glowing tubers found in the Lost Vault, offering a wholly different, but still light related, challenge.

There are other aspects that might encourage or discourage growth as well; vines need trellises to shape the path of their growth, for example. Some plants thrive when various types of insects, such as bees, can interact with them. For almost every crop you can plant, there’s a wealth of knowledge you can learn which will enable your character to do more and yield higher quality produce. Farming is perhaps one of the most knowledge intensive crafting experiences in the game, with knowledge not only expanding what techniques – what modes of interaction – are available, but revealing what needs to be done for your plants in the unique circumstances you find yourself in.

Without a doubt, there’s more to the well-being of plants than just soil conditions, sunlight, and irrigation. Plants can be stricken with diseases – blights – just as the tribes of Mann can, and they are susceptible to other infections, and the infestations of parasites as well. It depends on the plant, but a good farmer will take the time to regularly inspect their crops to see how they’re fairing. If leaves are yellowing, or holes are appearing, it could be a sign that something needs to be done to mediate the soil or remove a pest.

Inspecting plants is done by using the inspect action on the plants in the world. This will allow you to see the plant in a detailed view, looking closely at its leaves, fruit, or other features for signs of blight, infestation, or infection. Once you’ve found a problem, you’ll want to consider how you’re going to address it.


Sometimes, that will mean seeking out an alchemist for compounds to add to the soil or the water. Other times, it might mean finding a way to get rid of the pests in your field, such as introducing a natural predator for the creatures that infest your crops. In still other cases it could mean something else entirely. And, in fact, there’s almost always more than one way to deal with a problem as a farmer, and which approach you take will depend quite a bit on what services you have access to and the knowledge of plants that you’ve amassed as you ply your trade.

One thing to keep in mind is that what happens to your plants as they grow has a large impact on the results of your labors. It's possible to raise your crops in ways that make them more suited to one purpose or another. We've mentioned that you might need to use the products of an alchemist to help prepare or maintain your soil, but it's also true that what you grow can be more or less suited to different economic applications, such as alchemy, depending on the properties that the plant takes on as it grows. Farming isn't just about providing food for you and yours; many of the crops you'll plant will be grown for commercial or industrial purposes. Whether you're growing crops for an alchemist to turn into solvents, glues, or other industrial compounds, growing produce for consumption, or growing ingredients used in the production of medicine, you'll want to grow produce that has different properties, and what happens to your plant while its raised has a lot to do with which properties your plant possess.

Once you’ve shepherded your crop through its growth phase and it’s matured, you can begin to think about the harvest. If your crops are the type that die after they go to seed, you’ll begin the whole cycle anew once you’ve harvested the produce. However, in the case of our apple seeds, the tree can produce for years to come, assuming it's properly cared for. The trick with a fruiting tree is triggering it to fruit in the first in place.

For the plants that fruit, bearing fruit is just another stage in its life-cycle. Just as there are conditions that trigger a sprout moving into the growth phase, or attaining maturity, there are also conditions that must be met for a tree, or other such plants, to bear fruit. This might require pollination from an insect like a bee, or it might require environmental conditions such as a series of days in a particular temperature band at the right time of year. Every plant’s conditions are different and can consider multiple factors, including the size of the plant, the temperature of the biome, the presence of certain insects, the humidity level, and more. With apple trees it takes time, and for the tree to be over a certain size, first and foremost, but the presence of good pollinators makes a difference, too.

Once your tree is bearing fruit, it’s time to harvest. Just as with planting there are a few different ways you can go about this. The most labor-intensive route is to literally go tree to tree, using each apple with an open hand to pluck it from a branch before they fall overripe to the earth below. Alternately, a more efficient solution could present itself with a little research and ingenuity. You might even find a way to do your picking from the ground, catching the apples as they fall.

Some plants need to be pulled from the ground to harvest them and, as a farmer, you’ll find yourself moving down your planted rows using an open hand on each plant to yank them from the soil. Others' produce must be cut away from the plant, such as the grapes on a vine. Still others can be reaped with a scythe or similar instrument, cut down into sheaths that can be gathered in bulk to be processed later. There are always multiple techniques you can apply, and if all else fails, you can always literally pull the thing out of the soil or chop it down and harvest your produce from the plant’s now dead body. How you go about your work is somewhat up to you.


That said, every strategy has its own value; even though you may be able to get another season's yield from a crop there may be cases where it’s still worth harvesting your produce destructively. For example, you might want to plough the remains back into the soil to help replenish the nutrients that your growing plants have consumed. And, there is always the finished result to consider:

The methods you use, and the conditions your plants experience as they grow, indelibly change the properties of the plant and the produce it yields. Just as the techniques one can use in smithing can change the performance of the resulting item, the properties imparted to a plant as it grows can alter the desirability and in-game effects of its produce. You may have mastered a plan for growing your apple trees that allows you to pack them in densely and yields many apples, but that process may leave them sour and only suitable for certain applications, such as the creation of ciders, or as ingredients for the potions and other concoctions made through alchemy. This might limit their value. On the other hand, it might be that the cider business is lucrative in your part of the world, and sour apples are exactly what you need.

The point of our crafting framework is not to make those decisions for you, but rather to give you the freedom to decide what “best” means for you and your plans. There’s more than one way to grow an apple tree, and more than one kind of apple a tree can grow; only you can know for sure what success means for your farm and your crops.

Good luck!

Discuss

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Fros - 1 month ago

I actually read the whole thing and am super excited to be a farmer/baker.

Lodrig - 2 months ago

I'm reminded of a system from another game in which the conditions which your plant grew under would effect the quality (not just quantity) of your harvest.

Four quality tiers existed, and when you harvested you got a different variation of the crop to indicate the quality (with an intermediate condition just resulting in a mixed crop). For example you would get different colors of cabbage, with say a Kale as low quality and green cabbage and for the highest tiers red and white cabbages which were very hard to get because you had to get a near perfect conditions.

And these would all grow from a single seed type a generic 'cabbage' seed which made the seed market much less complex. And in reality (I garden so I know) all these seeds are indistinguishable by visual inspection because they are all the same plant species, in the case of cabbages, broccoli, kale etc it's all Brassica oleracea the ancestral plant that was selectively breed.

Most folks don't realize that nearly all our vegetable crops are in only 8 to 10 groups. So a system of just 8-10 types of seeds and 4 tiers per group would mean between 36-40 end products readily identifiable and more ascetically appealing then mouse-over descriptions like "Low quality Cabbage". This also means that we don't need to conflate a spoiling vegetable with that was poor to start with.

Obviously cooking recipes would generally just call for 'any cabbage' with the higher quality types simply having a bonus to the resulting dishes quality. But the option for elite recipes which operate on a 'any tier X or higher' to mark these food items as inherently rarer and more refined.

The effect on the market for farm produce was quite good too, merchants didn't need to advertise 'Level 16 cabbages for sale, 4 gp each" and other immersion breaking stuff. It allowed wealthy players to bid up the price of the premium vegetables while allowing lots of cheap food-stuffs for the poor.

And the farming algorithm would 'drop' a small percentage of mid to high tier product for even the farmer who's had only achieved low tier conditions (it was bell curve based), bringing the fun of 'rare drops' to farming and allowing them to sell into the premium market and enticing them to climb up the value chain.

The only barrier I would see to this is if the game actually plans to track plant genetics and have it's own selective breeding and cultivation of varieties, In which case that would replace everything described here. I'm fairly sure animal breeding will be genetic in that manor but I saw no mention of it here so this would be a kind of low fidelity substitute.

SilkyBazaar - 2 months ago

If they can't produce a map, 3 weeks after they said it was finished how much hope do we have of this dream ever reaching reality

Mhin - 2 months ago

Sounds promising. Looking forward to the challenges ahead.

Germanicus - 2 months ago

It’s an excellent text, you learn a lot.

cazari - 2 months ago

Another great article to learn from.

IndraAllian - 2 months ago

I like this very much. Great work!

Tarloch - 2 months ago

That sounds fantastic.

It's exciting to see real world principals of that depth being applied. I look forward to growing a bit o grub.

WyrdManiac - 2 months ago

Wow, I like the compexity! Looking forward to grow my first crops.

helluva - 2 months ago

If we a usind chemicals, how that will affect surrounding flora and fauna, that's how we killed our one lands in rl. If I'm not mistaken if u want nice fruiting tree u start seedlings in pots in greenhouse

Turlorn - 2 months ago
@helluva:

Posted By helluva at 10:39 PM - Sun May 05 2019

If we a usind chemicals, how that will affect surrounding flora and fauna, that's how we killed our one lands in rl. If I'm not mistaken if u want nice fruiting tree u start seedlings in pots in greenhouse

You are correct that fertilizing wrongly or excessively can cause serious harm to the soil and the ground water.

It would be great if there were similar consequences in the game.

I'm convinced that there won't be any fertilizers in the game that require industrial processes (like the Haber-Bosch process). However there's still plenty of fertilizer that can be produced by a farm, found in nature or dug out from the ground.
Overdoing it with these fertilizers can also damage the soil and polute ground water.

Previously the developers mentioned a couple of times that players can negatively influence a biome. Like through deforestation for example. So negative consequences from overfertilizing might be possible.

helluva - 2 months ago
@Turlorn:

As far as I know the best fertilizes that have only positive effect a compost, well rotted covs or horse manure, not the fresh one that will burn u plants, rabbit and chicken manure, chicken manure a the best source of nitrogen, its what plants need for leaf development. And natural soil boosters seaweed, ash, fish blood and bone mix, crushed egg shells, spend tea and coffee. There is new gardening method no dig, it is explained as the best, cos u don't disturb soil structure. I hope SBS will look in to this to make farming more interesting

helluva - 2 months ago
@Turlorn:

As far as I know the best fertilizes that have only positive effect a compost, well rotted covs or horse manure, not the fresh one that will burn u plants, rabbit and chicken manure, chicken manure a the best source of nitrogen, its what plants need for leaf development. And natural soil boosters seaweed, ash, fish blood and boun mix, crushed egg shells, spend tea and coffee. There is new gardening method no dig, it is explained as the best, cos u don't disturb soil structure. I hope SBS will look in to this to make farming more interesting

helluva - 2 months ago
@Turlorn:

As far as I know the best fertilizes that have only positive effect a compost, well rotted covs or horse manure, not the fresh one that will burn u plants, rabbit and chicken manure, chicken manure a the best source of nitrogen, its what plants need for leaf development. And natural soil boosters seaweed, ash, fish blood and boun mix, crushed egg shells, spend tea and coffee. There is new gardening method no dig, it is explained as the best, cos u don't disturb soil structure. I hope SBS will look in to this to make farming more interesting

helluva - 2 months ago
@Turlorn:

As far as I know the best fertilizes that have only positive effect a compost, well rotted covs or horse manure, not the fresh one that will burn u plants, rabbit and chicken manure, chicken manure a the best source of nitrogen, its what plants need for leaf development. And natural soil boosters seaweed, ash, fish blood and boun mix, crushed egg shells, spend tea and coffee. There is new gardening method no dig, it is explained as the best, cos u don't disturb soil structure. I hope SBS will look in to this to make farming more interesting

Pendulum - 2 months ago

Informative, thank you! I think I'll be doing some farming and it's good to see that the design of it will be immersive.

Feyreisa - 2 months ago

Ermagerd!!! Thanks so much for this Snipe! Love all the amazing details and that even farming is going to be an adventure. So much excite! <3

EmmaGoldenfeld - 2 months ago

Great journal! Farming won't be boring, that's for sure! :D

SebastianYngve - 3 months ago

What about the symbiotic relation between trees and mushroom?

Trougout every forest there is a myriad of different mushrooms spreading their mycelium and distributing the many compounds neded by the plantlife in particular trees from many remote areas of the forest.

Many mushrooms and other organisms vill over time colonise the many areas of the plants and thus taking up nices and space on the plant leaving less room for other organisms including parasitic ones thus making the plant more resistent to such invasions.

So could the following be beneficial when planting and growing an orchard? Ask a hunter to find healty old trees of different kinds (preferably of the kind the orchard will consist of) in the forest and bring back samples of its bark, roots and soil, mix the samples in the soil you plant your trees in and rubb them against the bark of your growing trees.

Thus stimulating the formation of a robust and symbiotic mycelium network ensuring nutrients are transmited troughout the soil and making your trees more resistant against infection.

Mortality - 3 months ago

As someone who has actually grown purple carrots I can tell you the carrot flies absolutely love em, they arnt so keen on the orange ones tho.

Love the shiny ty :)

Alserian - 3 months ago

Sweet

Scipion - 3 months ago

I hope an appletree will fit in my garden

Calomel - 3 months ago

I've been looking forward to news on farming, thank you for this!

Moonlynx - 3 months ago

I am hoping that the animal husbandry side of farming is as good as the botany side appears to be.

Grizzly1 - 3 months ago
@Moonlynx:

Posted By Moonlynx at 09:11 AM - Sun Apr 28 2019

I am hoping that the animal husbandry side of farming is as good as the botany side appears to be.

Same here. This'll be where my priorities are. Something to really sink my teeth into! (Punning levels increase as we get closer to DSS,.. can't help it,..)

ilakyd - 3 months ago

I appreciate the fine details sbs puts into their design. In fact its one of coe's best qualities. Normally when I play a game, lots of mechanics are reduced to something simplistic, like pressing a single button. The great games that I remember and love go above and beyond. Its engaging and fun, and you have to learn. When you get good at it, its rewarding. The first example that comes to mind is Skyrim's lock picking mechanic. Its more than just a button.

Coming from a family of generations of farmers, I can really appreciate that theres more to growing crops than just putting a seed in the ground and waiting. Its more than most games offer.

Thanks for another awesome dj and keep up the great work sbs.

Alberos - 3 months ago

I wonder if I as a player could experiment and try different crop rotations without the character actually posessing special skillbars?

Do I need to get the skillbars before testing different crops? Is it skill locked or can I play around with soil and plants and seeds?

Will as a player be able to see how wet the soil is or determine the soil "structure"? Or is that a skill based thign that give you an answeer if your character knows?

ShadowTani - 3 months ago

Those of you arguing complexity, you're making assumptions. I've played a MMO sandbox game before that have crop rotation mechanics, and even if it's a complex system it's presented simply enough through a understandable and intuitive UI. It was a nice system that made the farming mechanics addictive and fun, as you had to do crop rotation to keep increasing the quality of the land and its produce.

And if any trade is a bit hard to get into then it just means there's more use for the schools.

Please don't dumb down the game, thank you.

Snipehunter - 3 months ago
@ShadowTani:

Posted By ShadowTani at 05:06 AM - Sat Apr 27 2019

Those of you arguing complexity, you're making assumptions. I've played a MMO sandbox game before that have crop rotation mechanics, and even if it's a complex system it's presented simply enough through a understandable and intuitive UI. It was a nice system that made the farming mechanics addictive and fun, as you had to do crop rotation to keep increasing the quality of the land and its produce.

To address the concerns about complexity broadly, let me say: The system is robust, but quite a few things in the world work to ensure that it's also not really all that complex from the point of view of a player.

First, the system for growing plants applies to every growing plant in the game. This means that wild plants grow the same way, and they do so unattended, which itself means that if the conditions are right, plants can grow with no maintenance at all. There are farming techniques (such as dry farming) that don't rely on irrigation, biomes where pest control is effectively handled for you by the environment itself, and many plants that are hardy enough that most blights won't affect them. In terms of the activity of farming, the point isn't to make farming incredibly labor intensive; it's to allow for farming to have the breadth and depth of experience that any other primary gameplay occupation would have, so that players have more overall freedom.

But, if you're living where its native, and all you want to do is plant wheat, you're going to find that farming is a pretty laid back job, most of the time. In some ways that mimics the experience of a farmer historically. It would not surprise me to find that most player farmers are farmers/something else, using downtime as they wait for their untroublesome crops to grow to pursue some other craft or occupation.

The vast majority of the complexity in the system happens in the background, on the server in the growth sim. That results of that sim are conveyed to you the user in-world, not as complex UI or vast spreadsheets, but as literal in-game changes to assets and the like. In that respect, if you find growing a houseplant complex and labor intensive, you may feel the same here in Elyria.

How much you want to engage with the system is a choice. You could look at yellowing leaves and like a forensic investigator pick apart everything you see on the plant to determine exactly what is wrong and what to do about it, or you could shrug, maybe throw a little fertilizer or water at the plant, and hope for the best. Chances are that, unless the problem is particularly acute, your plant reaches maturity and yields produce either way.

That produce may be different, possessing different qualities, though. If that bothers you, you can obsess over it and work to do better. However, the pursuit of that degree of excellence isn't the casual farming folks are afraid we won't have, anyway.

To say it explicitly: If you want to farm casually, you can. You will find success doing so. On the other hand, if you want to nerd out on your horticulture to pursue your idea of the perfect produce, you can do that too -- and making sure that is possible is where the system's complexity comes in. None of it is forced on you; our design philosophy isn't to force complexity on players. Rather we strike to make possible the spectrum of experience a tradecraft in an evolving world deserves so that you are free to decide for yourself the scope and intensity of your involvement with any given activity.

Hope that helps! :)

Kyxsune - 3 months ago
@Snipehunter:

Posted By Snipehunter at 2:47 PM - Sat Apr 27 2019

How much you want to engage with the system is a choice. You could look at yellowing leaves and like a forensic investigator pick apart everything you see on the plant to determine exactly what is wrong and what to do about it, or you could shrug, maybe throw a little fertilizer or water at the plant, and hope for the best. Chances are that, unless the problem is particularly acute, your plant reaches maturity and yields produce either way.

This makes me really excited for the Investigator system. The system is aware of a lot of things and how it chooses to present them to us as players is fascinating.

Abigor - 3 months ago

Agree with Nahkahiiri view, I'm afraid it will become too complex that it will scare off any casual farmers.

But don't get me wrong, I love the DJ, and everything snipe mentioned, I wouldn't take out, complexity is good, but:

At the same time every crafting should be accessible to people who don't want to micromanage everything and keeping track of 50 things, and I agree with Gromschlog on this - if the plant is native and common to biome, plant should be able to grow and give yields if you just simply plant it and maybe water from time to time (in theory some plants should even grown without being tended since plants do grown without people interference irl)

Basically people shouldn't be a rl chemists to do alchemy, rl farmers to do farming etc, that's why some of us play the game so we can do something that we generally don't do in rl.

Now does it mean it should be dumbed down? no, as I mentioned I would not take anything out from what snipe mentioned, it just that a casual player should be able to keep track of few things and get a good yield results from things that are expected to grown in biome, and work at about 75-100% efficiency. But at the same time have more complex levels of plays, like listed here so people who do want to delve deeper into any craft have opportunity to do what a casual player might not be able to - either by adopting plants that are not native, or allowing plants to have better properties or increasing the yields, going over 100% efficiency.

Maybe it's how it will be, and I misunderstood the DJ, but at first look it seems so complex that many causal players will just decide it's not worth their time :)

Costanius - 3 months ago

Sounds way too complex for a MMO-game with so many other features planned. Soulbound, do You seriously think You will be able to programme this all, together with all the other planned features, in an appropriate amount of time?

Lethality - 3 months ago
@Costanius:

That's the point... any one of the activities in the game can BE the main activity in the game, if you so choose.

No, you aren't likely to be an ace combatant AND a hardcore farmer - but that interdepdendcy is what makes the clock tick :)

From what we know, the goal is... this won't be like other games where there are tons of "side" activities to do, in addition to your "main combat and questing" - all activities are main activities and will require significant knowledge and time investment.

Farming has been elevated from something players "do because there's a farming system in place", to something player choose to pursue as a core game activity.

Gromschlog - 3 months ago
@Costanius:

Posted By Costanius at 12:18 PM - Sat Apr 27 2019

Sounds way too complex for a MMO-game with so many other features planned. Soulbound, do You seriously think You will be able to programme this all, together with all the other planned features, in an appropriate amount of time?

I dont see an issue with programming here. Its not really thaat complex. But it creates and requires a huge amount of data, if every single plant in the world checks for all those factors every x minutes to determine if it should get to the next step in its lifecycle.

KypiqStomper - 3 months ago

Hmm my only fear is that this will mean that is will take a hugh amount of processing power to play the game.

Leeahna - 3 months ago

"In Chronicles of Elyria, you can’t physically dig into the terrain – you can’t dig a channel for water to flow through"

Wait, does this mean we can't hide treasure in the ground anymore as was said a while ago? While i understand this might be too far reaching to achieve in a game, i just want to confirm it's out. What about tunneling?

Snipehunter - 3 months ago
@Leeahna:

Posted By Leeahna at 02:41 AM - Sat Apr 27 2019

"In Chronicles of Elyria, you can’t physically dig into the terrain – you can’t dig a channel for water to flow through"

Wait, does this mean we can't hide treasure in the ground anymore as was said a while ago? While i understand this might be too far reaching to achieve in a game, i just want to confirm it's out. What about tunneling?

No, you can bury treasure, but doing so isn't going to leave a hole in the ground that you lower a chest into. likewise, tunneling will never create a ditch, but you can still tunnel. When you begin to tunnel you build an entrance to your underground area that acts as the transition between the surface terrain and the subterranean content. Basically, we handle those cases through different technology than we use for surface layer of terrain, but in doing so we absolutely preserve the ability to bury an object or tunnel below the surface/into a mountain.

Hope that helps! :)

Leeahna - 3 months ago
@Snipehunter:

Posted By Snipehunter at 8:28 PM - Sat Apr 27 2019

Posted By Leeahna at 02:41 AM - Sat Apr 27 2019

"In Chronicles of Elyria, you can’t physically dig into the terrain – you can’t dig a channel for water to flow through"

Wait, does this mean we can't hide treasure in the ground anymore as was said a while ago? While i understand this might be too far reaching to achieve in a game, i just want to confirm it's out. What about tunneling?

No, you can bury treasure, but doing so isn't going to leave a hole in the ground that you lower a chest into. likewise, tunneling will never create a ditch, but you can still tunnel. When you begin to tunnel you build an entrance to your underground area that acts as the transition between the surface terrain and the subterranean content. Basically, we handle those cases through different technology than we use for surface layer of terrain, but in doing so we absolutely preserve the ability to bury an object or tunnel below the surface/into a mountain.

Hope that helps! :)

Thank you for answering my question :).

Gromschlog - 3 months ago
@Snipehunter:

Posted By Snipehunter at 8:28 PM - Sat Apr 27 2019

Posted By Leeahna at 02:41 AM - Sat Apr 27 2019

"In Chronicles of Elyria, you can’t physically dig into the terrain – you can’t dig a channel for water to flow through"

Wait, does this mean we can't hide treasure in the ground anymore as was said a while ago? While i understand this might be too far reaching to achieve in a game, i just want to confirm it's out. What about tunneling?

No, you can bury treasure, but doing so isn't going to leave a hole in the ground that you lower a chest into. likewise, tunneling will never create a ditch, but you can still tunnel. When you begin to tunnel you build an entrance to your underground area that acts as the transition between the surface terrain and the subterranean content. Basically, we handle those cases through different technology than we use for surface layer of terrain, but in doing so we absolutely preserve the ability to bury an object or tunnel below the surface/into a mountain.

Hope that helps! :)

This sounds, like the entrance for tunnels is like a portal to another dimension and that the tunnel wouldnt actually exist in the normal world. What happens, if I start tunneling into a smaller hill and the tunnel starts getting longer than the actual hill? Will I get an error message when reaching the other side? Or will I have to create the other entrance before reaching it from the inside? Or can the tunnel actually be bigger than the hill, as it exists in another "layer"? Or will reaching the other side of the hill automatically create such a transition point from the inside?

Bludragon - 3 months ago

Awesome detail, just the way it ought to be. But, there is no mention about how we go about acquiring seeds for planting. I'm curious about how we will get those. It would make sense to be able to forage for seed stock from the surrounding area so that we have seed types that like the environment we are farming in, especially in the beginning of the farm.

AmrielAngel - 3 months ago

I LOVED this! I plan to focus quite a bit on the farming aspect of the game my first life, so seeing more information on how it's going to work was really amazing!

Zampher - 3 months ago

Gotta be honest. Love how excited people are about the challenge of a skill. Suggests solid interest an creativity.

Scorus - 3 months ago

Let me request a similar article on food and drink, cooking, brewing, and distilling. Thanks.

Taco - 3 months ago

"Others' produce will must be cut away from the plant..."

I believe the "will" must be removed. ;)

Talesi - 3 months ago

Excellent article. Thank you.

Firiqian - 3 months ago

Does anyone else think processing all that information for every plant on the server will take an obscene amount of processing power?

Protey - 3 months ago
@Firiqian:

Posted By Firiqian at 4/26/2019 6:57:32 PM

Does anyone else think processing all that information for every plant on the server will take an obscene amount of processing power?

Won't matter. As Caspian said in Discord, it's possible for companies to get remote management of their backend servers and dynamically scaling hardware. If the server load gets too high, a click of a button can deploy a new instance with a new set of docker containers that can lighten the load of other instances. This makes deploying microservice based systems easier.

You can read what he wrote here

BlueDragon - 3 months ago

Starvation was a major concern for a lot of areas during the Middle Ages; so I really like the fact that CoE is going to implement pests and blights on crops. This will definitely create tension between regions. Well done.

Cold0911 - 3 months ago

OH YEAH - this is gonna be super complex. love it.

Nienori - 3 months ago

Will there be anything to prevent nefarious persons, a rival neighboring farm perhaps, from sneaking over the fence and salting your fields?

CrazyWray - 3 months ago

So now you've played the seed for this long awaited information on some of the aspects of farming & crop growing, Would you share some of the fruits of labour with us ?

More so around what the dietary needs are of the different tribes, What's the Does/might the average Janoan eat during the course of a day,

What culinary delights gets the To-reshian blood pumping.

Would love to hear about these.

Many hands make light work.

PhKnight - 3 months ago

Love how in depth this game is being developed to be. The only worry I have is how will they feed towns if there are no players actually farming? Will the NPC be able to farm and provide enough food? My guess is yes, but only to a point. Not the best quality or quantity of food. Just enough to keep the town from completely starving. I would hate to have like 100 human players in a town, but the town starves because none of the players are actually farming.

Hellmoon - 3 months ago
@PhKnight:

Posted By PhKnight at 10:06 AM - Fri Apr 26 2019

Love how in depth this game is being developed to be. The only worry I have is how will they feed towns if there are no players actually farming? Will the NPC be able to farm and provide enough food? My guess is yes, but only to a point. Not the best quality or quantity of food. Just enough to keep the town from completely starving. I would hate to have like 100 human players in a town, but the town starves because none of the players are actually farming.

There's always trade, if a town doesn't have players/etc to grow its own food - hopefully it (or the people who live there) excel in something else to be able to trade products, services, or coin for food.

Malais - 3 months ago

Wow that is rather robust. As an agrarian focused county I imagine this is something I will really really need to understand.

Kudos for making farming of all things complex enough to actually fail at. 😉

Sildadia - 3 months ago

Great post! Complicated the hell out of my orchard plan but great post!

Turlorn - 3 months ago

This sounds like a great and solid foundation for a realistic farming system that is both complex as well as fun.

However I agree with Gromschlog that plants that are native to a biome should be able to grow on their own in this biome with watering and fertilizing just increasing the yield.

I have one additional question:

Will the system also track the amount of dead organic matter (humus content) in the soil?
Humus is very important for overall soil health and fertility.

RubbrChickn - 3 months ago

Apple trees take 7-10 years to bear fruit irl from seed, and you can't expect the apples will even be edible just because the parent tree's apples were. You have to graft a branch from a good fruiting apple tree irl to reliably make a fruit tree bear apples that are what you were expecting. I wonder if this would be in the game, if we have to find out for ourselves...

Daarco - 3 months ago

Amazing!

This will hugely impact each server´s development. Will Kingdoms starve or not?

And making farming as complex as the combat system really makes you think what you want to do ingame with the limited time you have with each character.

Gromschlog - 3 months ago

plants should and will be able to grow by themselves. If not, we wouldnt be in a sustainable world. The mentioned methods therefore can only be required to reach a maximum potential in efficiency, not to grow anything at all (unless you want to grow things where they dont grow). As long as players go on and plant whatever natually grows in their environment and dont go too much into monocultures, there should not be an issue with farming for casuals. And OPC and NCP AI certainly needs to be able to gather the required knowledge via knowledge system to fulfill the required tasks to be a good farmer.

Faustes - 3 months ago

oh i LOVE THIS i have been waiting years for a game where farming feels like actually growing things.

sarmasken - 3 months ago

I like the this deep crafting system! It seems like a complex system. I am looking forward to seeing the result of it. I am sure some factors and variables can make the system very volatile, especially the diseases impacting the plants. It will be nice to look more into to the insekts and diseases impacting the farming. What factors will decide the number of diseases and how do they occur? Is it a in game developed system creating the diseases attacking the plants? or is it a kind of game master deciding when a disease will impact the Elyria?

Draguta - 3 months ago

Fantastic read and very informative! Thanks Snipehunter!

Daynen - 3 months ago

Now THIS is a crafting system.

YOU SEE THIS, DEVELOPERS?

-THIS- IS A CRAFTING SYSTEM, DAMNIT.

odd fella - 3 months ago

This was a great shiny. Hope to see more informed ones like this.

Nightfinger - 3 months ago

@Nahkahiiri, the main thing to keep in mind is that any one player won’t have to and shouldn’t undertake every role or job. Those who like farming have a lot to learn and can go deep into it if they want. Probably just some basic farming knowledge will suffice for the average player who has to dabble.

@Snipehunter
Can blood be used in farming if water is scarce?
Are there any plants that need blood to grow?
Would blood instead of water affect the qualities of the plant? 😉

Harmonic Distortion - 3 months ago

Can you grow Kypiq in farms? I heard they are balanced meal for the Brudvir. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmhh hmmmmmmmmmmmmm!

CalenotKale - 3 months ago

This was absolutely beautiful to read and learn about! I plan on having a small orchard for my guild to feed and to make different kinds of alcohols and other treats, and learning a bit more about that truly was great to read!

Sareseras - 3 months ago

Nice shiny, was hoping for some details on pests, but that can wait until a swarm of pests cause such a ruckus it becomes an event.

CrazyWray - 3 months ago

At last, Been waiting for this one for almost a year, Great stuff, thank you.

Zakarus - 3 months ago

Nice CoE farmers will be in heaven reading this.

Shamstone - 3 months ago

Very interesting and very in depth.... I hope our NPCs already have a good grasp of this from day 1 or I predict mass starvation coming about....... now!

Good to have such mechanics, so long as they are manageable.

Lucasdb - 3 months ago

Thank you for this snipe. Thet was a very good read

Nahkahiiri - 3 months ago

While all this sounds great and something I really look forward to, I do have fears... I just try to be realistic.

Will CoE be only for HC players? The learning curve for whatever you want to do seems to be a huge wall which goes straight up. Will there be anything for casual farmers when you are required to know and do a lot of ingame stuff to be able to grow something? How many players want to work ingame? Same applies to other professions as well... It starts to feel like I have to be online checking my crops every day so they don't die. I have very little trust on OPC-code to be able to keep my crops alive. What if my crops die or get damaged... my dude loses money due to reduced income from the harvest. Then my dude can be in a real trouble getting new seeds or whatever for next season which is next week IRL. What if I'm on holiday for the next week or two and can't play? That OPC-code really needs to be working...

Other fear is, does SBS have enough resources to do all the coding, testing etc to implement all this? It's easy to plan everything on paper, but it's another thing to make it "reality" and working.

How much computing power all this needs? Huge world (x4) where each plot's soil characteristics and each plant's characteristics (planted and naturally "born") needs to be calculated... Will there be enough revenue to pay the bills? Younger players have time, but they don't necessarily have patience anything that takes more time than 15mins. Older players have most likely patience, but lack time due to family etc. If things get too complicated, younger players will quit and older players probably quit as well since they can't invest enough time. Sure there are exceptions, but in the end we most likely end up quite a small selection of players who stay => will it be enough?

Sometimes "keep it simple(r)" goes a long way, you can always make things more complicated later. It's also much cheaper than making things complicated first and then simplifying later.

I sincerely hope my fears won't come true...

Jomcot - 3 months ago
@Nahkahiiri:

Posted By Nahkahiiri at 08:15 AM - Fri Apr 26 2019

While all this sounds great and something I really look forward to, I do have fears... I just try to be realistic.

Will CoE be only for HC players? The learning curve for whatever you want to do seems to be a huge wall which goes straight up. Will there be anything for casual farmers when you are required to know and do a lot of ingame stuff to be able to grow something? How many players want to work ingame? Same applies to other professions as well... It starts to feel like I have to be online checking my crops every day so they don't die. I have very little trust on OPC-code to be able to keep my crops alive. What if my crops die or get damaged... my dude loses money due to reduced income from the harvest. Then my dude can be in a real trouble getting new seeds or whatever for next season which is next week IRL. What if I'm on holiday for the next week or two and can't play? That OPC-code really needs to be working...

Other fear is, does SBS have enough resources to do all the coding, testing etc to implement all this? It's easy to plan everything on paper, but it's another thing to make it "reality" and working.

How much computing power all this needs? Huge world (x4) where each plot's soil characteristics and each plant's characteristics (planted and naturally "born") needs to be calculated... Will there be enough revenue to pay the bills? Younger players have time, but they don't necessarily have patience anything that takes more time than 15mins. Older players have most likely patience, but lack time due to family etc. If things get too complicated, younger players will quit and older players probably quit as well since they can't invest enough time. Sure there are exceptions, but in the end we most likely end up quite a small selection of players who stay => will it be enough?

Sometimes "keep it simple(r)" goes a long way, you can always make things more complicated later. It's also much cheaper than making things complicated first and then simplifying later.

I sincerely hope my fears won't come true...

Exactly, I couldnt even finish reading it because I was just thinking about all of this. hahaha

Not trying to be negative but being through so many game developments....

Terham - 3 months ago
@Nahkahiiri:

Posted By Nahkahiiri at 08:15 AM - Fri Apr 26 2019

Will CoE be only for HC players? The learning curve for whatever you want to do seems to be a huge wall which goes straight up. Will there be anything for casual farmers when you are required to know and do a lot of ingame stuff to be able to grow something? How many players want to work ingame? Same applies to other professions as well... It starts to feel like I have to be online checking my crops every day so they don't die. I have very little trust on OPC-code to be able to keep my crops alive.

This is an impressive work, I love what you did with agriculture. But I have the same concerns than Nahkahiiri :

• How well will your AI manage this complexity ?

• Farming usually attracts casual players. In others MMO it's a user-friendly system used as an entrance door to sandbox MMO. Don't you think they will be overwhelmed by this needed amount of information ?

Lethality - 3 months ago
@Terham:

Well, something to consider is that in "other" MMOs, farming is something you typically do on the side, and outside the main core loop of the game.

Here in Elyria, as explained in Snipe's first paragraph farming can BE the main core loop of YOUR game, if you want it to be.

I am sure there will be aspects of each type of gameplay that are accessible to more casual players.

Noxidius - 3 months ago

Send melon pics

LORD_SHADOW - 3 months ago

beautiful

Zelcovian - 3 months ago

nice, been waiting for a journal like this... although makes me wonder how much of my time will be dedicated to farming to stock my alchemical focus.

Davepoleon - 3 months ago

This looks great! But it seems like if it's not done just right it could easily have such low quality of life that it's just not fun. Please make sure you don't forget to make sure it's fun!

Hieronymus - 3 months ago

What a fantastic design journal. I really hope you can accomplish what you've set out to do here. :)

kajoreh - 3 months ago

M.E.O.W. indeed !!!

Lady Grace - 3 months ago

Love it! The amount of data flying about may be a tad terrifying ... but hell yes I want this level of depth to farming!

Pull this off, and it'll be a home run with farmer-preference players.

Wolfguarde - 3 months ago

As someone considering starting a food garden, this was an excellent and informative read. It almost makes me regret choosing Brudvir, with their fields of ice and snow. Almost.

On a slightly related note (I'm not sure if this is something that can be answered yet, but just in case), reading through the sections on irrigation and crop rotation got me thinking back to what we currently know of tunnelling. I remember there was some talk about whether dirt would be removed from tunnels or not. If it is, would it then be possible to manually rotate soil or improve/lower its quality with loose dirt from excavation?

Dyrnwyn - 3 months ago

There are always multiple techniques you can apply, and if all else fails, you can always literally pull the thing out of the soil or chop it down and harvest your produce from the plant’s now dead body. How you go about your work is somewhat up to you.

Crop Looting Confirmed
Moonlynx - 3 months ago

Damn. Makes me wish I didn't sell the botany text books I had in college.

Dreamar - 3 months ago

An amazing write up. Loved reading it!

Perspicacity - 3 months ago

This is everything I wanted for the farming system & more, ungh, now I'm kind of foaming waiting so eagerly for the Alpha 2. GIIIIVE MEEEE, I NEED TO GROW ALL THE CROPS, AHHHHHHHH.

On a serious note, how much of an effect on the surrounding ecosystem would, say, trapping rabbits to protect your crops, shooting deer, putting up scarecrows, OR introducing a cat/dog to predate on pests have?

Will we have to take into account the flora & fauna that occurs naturally before deciding on a large pest preventative?

I'm also curious about one other thing; grafting, cultivation & guided out-breeding of crop strains, will we be able to employ such methods to increase genetic diversity & different blight/condition immunities?

I know it's mentioned that pushing the limits of adversities for them might have unforeseen results(Sour apples for crowded trees), but what about purposely seeking those changes or introducing foreign material from other, say, citrus fruits, to breed in desirable traits?

This isn't any kind of criticism, what you guys have so far is mindblowingly sexy, I say as a farmer main in every game ever, I'm just curious how deep & competitive this can go once the world has settled somewhat & the rush for land is replaced with experimentation & finding routines.

Huntsmaster - 3 months ago

Cool!

Esoba - 3 months ago

The attention to detail y'all are putting into each of these professions is impressive. Actually that word doesn't do it justice. While my playstyle will be with animals (breeding and training), the thought going into this demonstrates the commitment to excellent SBS is striving for.

Aemon_Blackfyre - 3 months ago

Holy crap. That is labor intensive and i love it! I have that much more respect for my farmers in game now.

Vucar - 3 months ago

The level of detail in this one facet of the game borders on unbelievable.

I don't know yet whether that should excite or alarm me.

KittCat - 3 months ago

I've been waiting so long for this!! Thank you!

Vashric - 3 months ago

This is quite the impressive breakdown and immersion of farming! Can't wait to see what all you farmers get yourselves into. The kingdoms are definitely counting on you all to keep us all fed! With how in-depth it is I hope people pick up on it quick.
It will be very interesting to see how NPC's and OPC's work and use the land. I'm sure people are going to dive into this day and night making sure they can produce great and 'enough' food for their Kingdoms. The idea of banding together with alchemists will be a lot of fun too. The way SBS is bringing together different elements is truly impressive and only making the excitement grow.
KEEP BRINGING THOSE SHINYS!

kuthedk - 3 months ago

just the level of detail this is... I really am impressed by everything you guys have been working on but this just about takes the cake at this point.

Amberic - 3 months ago

This certainly is very detailed.
I do hope the accumulated knowledge of generations of farmers who have farmed a plot is going to be available in some regard to our first generation farmers.

Kuponut - 3 months ago

I am so excited to farm :O

Scuttle - 3 months ago

This is great! I'm looking forward to seeing what we can make with Alchemy to help with farming, such as fertilizers or ways to treat blighted crops.

kainef - 3 months ago

and the farmers go willdddddd!!!!!!!

Worbs - 3 months ago

As a soil scientist who works around the globe addressing the problems we as humans have caused through intensive farming this level of detail is stunning. If you can pull this off in-game, I will tip my cap to you.

Fudgemuffinator - 3 months ago

Posted By Snipehunter at

16m2 plots of land

Squared, not cubed? No altitude or depth involved?! Blasphemy! I demand values for my sky flowers and deep root tubers!


@[email protected] I'M SO EXCITED! This all sounds so amazing... I'll be sad to retire my Stardew Valley overalls, but look forward to the new and exciting farming of Elyria!

Papa Mambo - 3 months ago

Looking forward to my intended profession at the beginning! I am curious as to how much downtime is provided to farmers while their plants grow or is farming large areas of land a full time job without down time? I'd like to use the time when my plants are growing to advance my character in other skills such as mining, or maybe even alchemy so that the two can work hand in hand.

Atlas Forgiven - 3 months ago

Awesome!

So a big part of Coe is Mann's interaction with the environment around him for better or worse. You mentioned we may need to alter the chemical properties of soil through the help of an alchemist in some ways.

I'm curious if altering the soil chemically en very large sections of land might affect the environment around it? For example Eutrophication in rivers as a result of additional minerals and nutrients being added through irrigation and water run off?

Bourneh - 3 months ago

Looks awesome, KEEP IT GOING!

Maevric - 3 months ago

Only thing I'm concerned a out is how effective the A.I. on NPC's will be in handling farming. Just because I feel there is a lot more from the world that affects it than other trades. I love that all this is so in depth, but if as a Baron, my farmers are all NPC based, will I have to micromanage those complexities? While the idea of hiring a player to do it would be charming/ideal... not everyone will have a player in their area.

Labbe - 3 months ago

This is the most intensive Shiny I've ever seen. SbS must have gone through a king's ransom in polish alone for this thing :O

Going to have to dedicate some time to just studying this since its Alchemy adjacent, and therefore deserves my undivided attention :D

Thanks for all the great Shinies lately Snipe <3

Elek - 3 months ago

Till Next time.....

KalTheo - 3 months ago

Loved reading this, thank you.

Loyheta - 3 months ago

A true MEOW. This is pretty great. As a former farmer I can appreciate the attention to detail. Most people don't know about crop rotation. xD

Augustus_Aquila - 3 months ago

Yesss... lovely... I will know how I to use all the seas I bough .

Zinnia - 3 months ago

Ah yes!! Very excited for this!

Serelinor - 3 months ago

Thanks for this extra shiny post!

(I was going to put in an image of Mari Ohara saying "Shiny!" but apparently I need more influence for that)

Xeyska - 3 months ago

Very informative, and highly anticipated. Thank you for providing this, Snipehunter. :)

Beathan - 3 months ago

We need an Elyrian Geological Survey to prepare good soils maps.

Cynn - 3 months ago
@Beathan:

Posted By Beathan at 8:29 PM - Thu Apr 25 2019

We need an Elyrian Geological Survey to prepare good soils maps.

Another profession to add to the list. This looks great!

Jon_Warren - 3 months ago

I like it!

Zoram - 3 months ago

This is one of the BEST and most accurate of all the detailed functions of gardening and agriculture. Kudos SBS. You knocked this out of the park. I'm truly impressed. I've been a Master Gardner for years. Well done.

Damocles316 - 3 months ago

Best shiny I have seen this year. Thank you!

Bassykins - 3 months ago

om nom nom nom

mandrake1980 - 3 months ago

THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! at long last we can learn how to feed the masses :)

Sage_Alluvial - 3 months ago

Oh my gosh I've been waiting so long for this, thank you so much Snipe! T_T

Oct - 3 months ago

Those carrots are beautiful

PixiePunchPie - 3 months ago

YAAAASSSS!!! Thank you for this AWESOME shiny!